Normally, we might consider the possible end of a power-sharing agreement – an agreement that was until now essential for Tunisia`s democratic transition – as something to be deplored. But this could be good news for Tunisian democracy, argue Sharan Grewal and Shadi Hamid. This piece was originally published in Foreign Policy. In recent weeks, the Tunisian government, led by Prime Minister Youssef Chahed, has faced growing calls from some political parties and civil society organizations to resign and imagine a new cabinet. Chahed`s government, the eighth in the country in as many years, has existed since August 2016, after Habib Essid`s previous cabinet failed to obtain a vote of confidence in parliament. It was reported that even Prime Minister Essid was unaware of Essebsi`s initiative until he was suddenly pressured to resign. Although Essid had previously refused to voluntarily abandon his position, his government was eventually constitutionally replaced after being denied a vote of confidence, a first in Tunisia`s history. Thus, the personalized decision-making process ultimately had an impact on the resignation of an elected government. Attayar (Democratic Current), a liberal anti-corruption party, has allied itself with the Achaab (Popular Movement) movement – a socialist, secular and Arab-nationalist party – to increase its influence within the ruling coalition. . . .