Under the SPS agreement, the WTO sets limits on Member States` policy on food security (bacterial contaminants, pesticides, inspection and labelling) and animal and plant health (phyto-hygiene) with regard to pests and imported diseases. There are three standards bodies that set standards on which WTO members should base their SPS methods. According to Article 3, they are the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the secretariat of the International Convention on the Protection of Plants (IPPC). One of the provisions of the SPS agreement is the obligation for members to facilitate the provision of technical assistance to developing countries, either through relevant international organizations or at the bilateral level. FAO, OIE and WHO have implemented important food, animal and plant security assistance programmes to developing countries. A number of countries also have important bilateral programmes with other WTO members in these areas. The WTO secretariat has organised a programme of regional seminars to provide developing countries (and Central and Eastern European countries) with detailed information on the rights and obligations conferred on them by this agreement. These seminars are organized in collaboration with Codex, OIE and IPPC to ensure that governments are aware of the role these organizations can play in helping countries meet their needs and to take full advantage of the benefits of the SPS agreement. The seminars are open to the participation of private professional associations and consumer organisations. The WTO secretariat also provides technical assistance through national workshops and governments through their representatives in Geneva. (a) the indication of indications or copies of projects or the publication of texts that are not in the member`s language, with the exception of paragraph 8 of this appendix; or 3 Codex also develops standards for food quality, nutrition and labelling. These other standards are not directly relevant to the SPS agreement, but they are relevant to the TBT agreement.

(Return to the text) (d) the accession and participation of the organizations concerned on its territory in international and regional plant health and protection organizations and systems, as well as bilateral and multilateral agreements and arrangements under this agreement, as well as the texts of these agreements and conventions. The scope of the two agreements is different. The SPS Convention covers all measures for protection: 1 In this agreement, the reference to Article XX, point b), also includes the chapter of this article. (Return to text) 2 For the purposes of Article 3, paragraph 3, a scientific justification is available when a member finds, on the basis of a review and evaluation of the available scientific information, in accordance with the relevant provisions of this agreement, that the relevant international standards, guidelines or recommendations are not sufficient to achieve its appropriate level of health or plant health protection. (Back to text) 3 For the purposes of Article 5, paragraph 6, a measure is no more restrictive than necessary for trade, unless there is another reasonably available measure, given the technical and economic feasibility, which reaches the appropriate level of health or plant health protection and is significantly less trade-restrictive. (return to text) 4 For the purposes of these definitions, the animal includes fish and wildlife; The plant includes forests and wild flora; Parasites are weeds; and contaminants are residues of pesticides and veterinary drugs and foreign substances. (Back to the text) 5 Health and plant health measures such as laws, regulations or regulations that are of general application.